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Research

To date, the registry has collected and organized data from 2,700 families who are at high risk for familial ovarian cancer. The data is used to monitor patterns and trends and plays an important role in research to identify the underlying genetic causes of ovarian cancer.

Research teams at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (where the registry is housed) and across the globe use the data collected by the Familial OCR to seek better methods for detecting, treating, curing and eventually preventing familial ovarian cancer.

 

Registry-related research projects currently underway

    • Some inherited gene mutations, such as BRCA1 or BRCA2, increase ovarian and breast cancer risk. For the past 12 months, RPCI researchers have been using registry information from families who have tested negative for BRCA1 and BRACA2 to conduct extended targeted sequencing of fifty genes known to function in a fashion similar to BRCA1 and BRCA2 hoping to identify new gene mutations that can be targeted for routine high risk testing.

 

  • Roswell Park Cancer Institute’s Center for Personalized Medicine is currently sequencing the genes of thousands of registry members whose BRCA status is unknown or negative to identify new high-risk genes beyond the fifty genes noted above.

Partners

The Familial OCR partners with other organizations that are also focused on ovarian cancer research. Together, we have made several important observations that have been published in peer-reviewed journals.

Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC)
OCAC is a forum of investigators of case-control studies of ovarian cancer, formed in April 2005. Many groups are conducting studies with the aim of identifying genes that may be related to the risk of ovarian cancer. The aim of the group is to combine data from many studies, to provide a reliable assessment of the risks associated with these genes.
Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA)
CIMBA is a collaborative group of researchers working on genetic modifiers of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. The aim of CIMBA is to provide sufficient sample sizes to allow large-scale studies in order to evaluate reliably the effects of genetic modifiers.

Track Family DNA

Research teams at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (where the registry is housed) and across the globe use the data collected by the Familial OCR to seek better methods for detecting, treating, curing and eventually preventing familial ovarian cancer.